Introduction to Residential Park living (the legislation)

The legislation governing residential parks is the Manufactured Homes Residential Parks Act 2003 (the Act) which replaced the old Mobile Homes Act 1989 and was seen by the Queensland Labour Government as a great leap forward because of the changing trends in the industry. The birth of the industry goes back to the less fortunate in our society who because of their personal financial position, turned to living in caravans as a permanent homes in caravan parks. This is what led to the now sophisticated residential parks with permanently built homes and very upmarket amenities and facilities. Ironically, many local authorities still categorize the modern residential parks as “caravan parks and relocatable home parks’ in their local laws. This terminology is hardly relevant to a home owner who has spent over $400,00.00 on a home in a residential park, which highlights the ignorance of most councilors, and indeed, many state politicians who still regard residential parks as glorified caravan parks because they are to lazy to educate themselves or their education standard prohibits any enlightenment.

During the second reading speech for the Manufactured Homes Residential Parks Bill 2003, The then Minister for Fair Trading stated:

“Manufacture homes are in essence permanent structures no easier or cheaper to to relocate than ordinary site-built homes. Under the current legislation, the use of the term “mobile home” gives an impression of a structure that is of relatively light construction and is easy to move from one place to another. While this may have been appropriate at one time, these homes are now more substantial and sophisticated. These homes are usually permanently or securely fixed to the ground and the costs involved in moving may be quite significant. I keeping with the changing trends in the industry, to to better reflect the more substantial nature of these types of homes, the Bill introduces the term “manufactured home”.

The above is lifted straight from the original May 2008 review of the Act section 5.1 page 12, any reader not familiar with this work can obtain a copy by contacting the writer as per our “contact us” tab on the main web page. It is worth the read because section 10 of the act describes a manufactured home thus:

10 (1) (b) is designed to be moved from one place to another; and (c) is not permanently attached to land. Brilliant isn’t it, the reason for the Act was to reflect the changes in the industry, vis-a-vis permanent structures not easy to move. Truly a contradiction in terms, logic like this could only emanate from parliament, but there is a reason for this conundrum, and that is to protect developers and park operators. This will be explained in “legislation 2″

David Paton 6 june 2011

 

 

The legislation governing the residential parks industry in Queensland is the Manufactured Homes Residential Parks Act 2003 (the Act) which replaced the old Mobile Homes Act 1989. The birth of the residential parks industry stems from the less fortunate in society that could not afford to buy a home in suburbia and were forced into permanent caravan living in caravan parks. Ironically, many local governments (councils) By-Laws, still refer to the modern sophisticated Residential parks as “caravan or relocatable home parks”. This is hardly encouraging to a home owner who has paid over $400,000.00 for a home in a residential park. Many councilors remain ignorent of what a residential park is, and many state politicians share the same lack of understanding and are too lazy to educate themselves.

During the second reading speech in parliament for the Manufactured Homes Residential Parks Bill 2003, the then minister for Fair Trading stated:

“Manufactured homes are in essence permanent structures no easier or cheaper to relocate than ordinary site-built homes”. The Minister was at that time, embracing the notion that these homes were still being built in factories and delivered to sites on the backs of trucks when in fact homes were already being built on site, however, the Minister was still way ahead of parliament generally.

The Minister continues:

“Under the current legislation, the use of the term “mobile home” gives an impression of a structure that is of relatively light construction and is easy to move from one place to another. While this may have been appropriate at one time, these homes are now more substantial and sophisticated. These homes are usually permanently or securely fixed to the ground and the costs involved in moving may be quite significant. In keeping with the changing trends in the industry, and to better reflect the more substantial nature of these types of homes, the Bill introduces the term “manufactured home”.

 


Post a Comment

Your email is never shared. Required fields are marked *

*
*